DRIED UP

To live in a place of deterioration and call it your own is a difficult process. People don’t want to stay or to move there because it’s a gradual collapse but those who stay yearn for change and development. There have been regeneration attempts from the council, but funds disappear and are invested into corporations that do little for the town rather than providing for its people and community. As a result, the town faces drastic unemployment, drug & alcohol problems and receives titles like ‘one of the most miserable towns’ from the national press.
The cul-de-sac town is stuck within the past, not because of choice but rather a lack of.

But when you do accept it - it becomes an extension of yourself, you become a loyalist to the borough. Only you can call it shit and also home, that’s an exclusivity of having the postcode. Regardless of its issues, there’s a certain longing emotion that rings deep within those who left, an honest sense of community, belonging and ironic self-deprivation.
That is why it’s people stay and take pride in their broken, industrial town.